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[titlebar]Tahquitz Canyon[/titlebar] The Disneyesque guided hiking tour of lower Tahquitz Canyon, right on the edge of Palm Springs, is a far cry from the scene here in the 1970s and 80s, when scores—sometimes hundreds—of hippies and impromptu squatters occupied the canyon’s idyllic glades. Flush with income from casinos and associated businesses, the canyon’s owner, the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, turned the situation around during the 1990s. After a massive eviction and cleanup effort, the Indians opened a visitor center at the mouth of the canyon and started offering hiking tours up to as far as Tahquitz Falls. These guided hikes are the only way to visit the canyon today, and they are offered only during the cooler months of the year.
[symple_button url=”http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=HGS241-245″ color=”gold” size=”default” border_radius=”3px” target=”blank” rel=”nofollow” icon_left=”” icon_right=””]Visit Website Here[/symple_button] [titlebar]Mecca Hills Wilderness Trails[/titlebar] Mecca Hills is a labyrinth of winding, eroded badlands and canyons upthrusted by the San Andreas Fault to create a wonderfully intricate maze. Sometimes called the Mud Hills, these slopes are nearly impossible to climb when wet. Fortunately, given the arid climate, this is not a major obstacle most of the time. Sandy washes with stands of smoke tree, ironwood, and palo verde cut through the hills. The Mecca aster—a species known only in this region and in Baja, Mexico—grows among these badlands. Bighorn sheep occasionally wander into the area. Box Canyon Road separates the wilderness into two units, with Hidden Spring Canyon to the south of the road and Painted Canyon to the north.
[symple_button url=”http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=HGS321-071″ color=”gold” size=”default” border_radius=”3px” target=”blank” rel=”nofollow” icon_left=”” icon_right=””]Visit Website Here[/symple_button] [titlebar]Cottonwood Spring/Moorten’s Mill Site Trail[/titlebar] Cottonwood Spring is a lovely patch of greenery in an otherwise arid landscape. The cottonwoods and fan palms were planted by the miners around the turn of the last century to make the spring conform to their concept of an oasis. In spite of this unnatural beginning, the sight is satisfying, and obviously the birds enjoy the location. The hike down the wash provides a display of a wash plant community in the Colorado Desert. Mesquite and smoke trees are dominant. A short hike in Cottonwood wash to visit a 1930s mill site.
[symple_button url=”http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=HGS256-027″ color=”gold” size=”default” border_radius=”3px” target=”blank” rel=”nofollow” icon_left=”” icon_right=””]Visit Website Here[/symple_button]

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